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of come. and welcome to a special edition of "morning wednesday, november 7the mornihe- new york city in front of a great, awake. what's wpeoplele? >> have y >> unbelievable. well there's just a little news to report this morning. president obama has won a second term in the white house. >> what? >> this is huge. go ahead.11:15 last night, the ne presid>
political figure in america who is anything remotely like that. michael bloomberg. new york city's mayor. he's an ex-republican and ex-democrat. he's now an independent. he's in his third term as the highly visible mayor of america's largest city. before it happened today, nobody expected michael bloomberg to make an endorsement at all in this year's presidential race. that's mostly because he said he wouldn't. back in june mr. bloomberg made sure to be overheard telling people at a party in new york city he intended to remain publicly neutral in this year's presidential race. but then today he didn't. in the midst of this city's ongoing and complicated and exhausting and heartbreaking and painstaking response to this unprecedented storm, the mayor of new york city published this 17-paragraph endorsement of president obama. the fact that nobody knew it was coming and that he said he wouldn't make an endorsement just made it that much more important. as did the fact it was not at all clear if he was going to make an endorsement the guy who he would endorse would be president obama. i mean, mi
, 40 of them in new york city. and while an army of federal, state, and local workers, and many volunteers, have joined the massive relief and recovery effort, 2-1/2 million remain without power, four days after losing it monday evening. tens of thousands are displaced. their homes broken or destroyed. 5500 remain in new york city shelters. gaslines stretch for hours and tempers flair. and as life returns to normal for many millions, from north carolina to maine, with folks living in the most severely area, on the new jersey shore, or the new york city burrows of brooklyn, queens and stat ten island, it's doubtful the scars will ever fully heal. the shocking loss of life in and around the nation's largest and commercially most important city. the epic extent and depth of the damage. and the struggle to find essentials like food, water, power, shelter, continue to preoccupy and stress out millions who thought that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodi
is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. problems still persist. traffic in the city is nothing short of a nightmare without public transportation wednesday manhattan streets were clogged with people trying to get back to work. there's some good news. subway and train service is starting up again today at least on a limited basis. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: mayor bloomberg is mandating that all cars driving into manhattan has to have at least three people. >> i know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but the streets can only handle so much. >> reporter: half of all gas stations in the area are closed. the result, long lines. >> hundreds of cars here trying to get gas. >> reporter: analysts say it could get another week to get all the gas stations back up and running. lack of power continues to be a problem in this area of manhattan. officials say, though, that people in manhattan may see the lights go back on as early as tomorrow or saturday. in other parts of
are broadcasting from new york city and st. louis, missouri. the death toll of superstorm sandy along the eastern seaboard has jumped to 98 as more bodies are recovered by the dead. 40 people have been killed in new york city, half of them on staten island, which was overcome with devastating flooding. staten island residents have criticized local and federal officials for allegedly ignoring recovery there, saying they're in desperate need of aid. new york city is facing criticism for continuing with its famed annual marathon nday, , spite calls for postponement. supporters of a delay have argued the marathon will divert attention and resources from aiding the hundreds of thousands who still lacked power and are in need of relief. utility officials have predicted that electricity will be mostly restored to lower manhattan by the weekend. though several million from long island to new jersey could be in the dark for a least another week, some 1.6 million people remain without power in new jersey. it is e state hardest hit by the storm. new jersey officials have disclosed some 336,000 gallons of di
. i can report to you right now, the new york city sanitation has set dump trucks and tractors that are at the end of this street picking up debris. the floodwater actually destroyed property inside the homes. take a look at this pile of garbage. refrigerators, furniture, all of this has to be dumped and take it out of here. if it sits here with the water damage, it will begin to mold. they are setting up port of parties so they can have sanitation. verizon is setting up a tower. that is a situation right now. we have been watching total strangers come by on this street offering food and water to people who live here. that is the latest from the situation here. no need to tell you they are. that's the marathon will be run did they think it should be postponed for another week. connell: thank you very much, adam. dagen: by the way, i just re- tweeted a column about why the marathon should not be run. power outages, meantime, still causing major problems. unbelievable, almost undescribable problems for drivers. take a look at this video. long lines at gas stations. not because of
towards normalcy. >>> in new york this morning, more signs of life getting back to routine. the city's massive subway system is roaring back to life. except in hard-hit manhattan. >> more power is being restored to that area, as well. that's where we find abc's mark greenblatt once again this morning. good morning, mark. >> reporter: good morning to you. right now, the death toll from hurricane sandy stands at a grisly 74. and over in new jersey, there's a looming threat ona and ongoine from ruptured natural gas lines. but in this neighborhood in lower manhattan, the lights are on for the first morning since sandy struck. the nation's largest public transit system will begin rolling again this morning, but with limited service. some tunnels and stations remain flooded. and power is still out in much of downtown. but the lights began to turn back on in some areas near wall street. still, subways won't run yet to the city's financial district. traffic clogged the streets as people returned to work. new york city mayor bloomberg announced only vehicles with three or more occupants will
that the storm killed 94 people in the united states. here in new york, the latest count by city officials indicates now 37 deaths, 19 of those on staten island alone. the red cross today century spons units to the hardest hit areas to distribute water. fema officials arrived there today with food and supplied. governor christie's office announced today that new jersey transit will restart with service tomorrow. officials are working to expand the limited service of the subways. amtrack will begin to run partial service of the city tomorrow. growing problem will be lines at stations stretching for more than a mile. in the city of yonkers officials are limits customers to no more than ten gallons. in south manhattan people went through dumpsters today to look for unspoiled food thrown out by a super market. officials warning that the east coast could be hit by another storm this time next week. the devastation on staten island the new york borough that was the hardest hit. we get the latest from nbc news correspondent. anne? >> good evening. three days after the hurricane. people in this co
that staten island was hit the hard est of all the areas of new york city. >> when you look at the geography of it it is the most exposed and direct ocean exposure up there and what i have been wondering about. was it a matter of us getting the tv cameras down there in order to get the attention that media resources were distributed in lower manhattan and elsewhere. but it seems like the media got there before government help started focusing obthere. when you have media and senators together. they bring along the media and i think having them come out here and pointing the spotlight on what we have been seeing for the last few days first hand got people's attention. and people realized how really bad it is out here on staten island and i think it does. the media in the last couple of day days in other areas of the region how bad it is i think today we have seen the results of that coverage just this morning. we now have red cross out here. the national guard has a presentation out here as of tonight. so, it has had a positive impact shining that spotlight on staten island and what we are go
. >> reporter: it's a nightmare in new york city for some. despite limited subway and mass transit service up and running, it's a super slow go and thousands have to commute by foot. >> walked across the brooklyn bridge. >> in manhattan hundreds of thousands still in the dark, some cold and starving. >> people are dumpster diving and what they are going after is the food. >> reporter: it may be days before the power is back. >> over 100,000 power lines on ground. >> reporter: across new york's long island power is out and patience is running out. >> i don't have the transportation out of here. >> reporter: in toms river, new jersey, a high school is now a shelter. in westwarck, connecticut, belongings remain strewn about. >> we need to get cleaned out. >> reporter: in west virginia the weight from sandy's heavy snow on monday has now collapsed roofs. the storm's wrath widespread and strong. >> no heat. we have no power. >> reporter: still, officials are encouraging. >> the good news is that there are a lot of people who want to help. >> reporter: but the grim reality, not so easy to swaggo, s
unbelievablably the new york city mara thon goes on sunday. most important picture on the cover of the new york post the gen rators are putting electricity to tents in central park instead of the entire area of staten island or long island. that area has no power or home or shelter, nothing. >> steve: it is here in new york city and streets of midtown are fill would of people who are here for the mara thon that is here this weekend. and politicians said why didn't they cancel it. we understand millions of dollars come in the city. but still, we have people in the water in new york city. it is the worst storm to ever hit new york city, eric, why is it going on? if rudy guiliani was the mayor of new york city. those generators would not be parked outside of a tent in central park they would be in staten island. >> eric: number one the morgs on staten island. they are using make shift morgs-- morgues. and mark them in the gas stations where the lines are long. only a few have power . number three getting power to people. like those people . we have no clothes. we can't get back in our homes. new y
hoboken clearly from the west side of new york city. and as of last night, the mayor told us, there were as many as 20,000 people, of the population 50,000 people in the city, there were as many as 20,000 people still stranded in deep, impassable, and increasingly polluted floodwaters. the national guard did get to some of those people, starting late last night and into today. we'll have more about that very dramatic situation in just a moment. the national guard also arrived this morning in moonachie, new jersey, where the storm surge swamped the town very, very quickly. people in all sorts of housing in moonachie were caught unaware and trapped, but particularly folks in mobile homes had a very difficult time there. members of the national guard also rushed to the assistance today of new york city' bellevue hospital, which has been running on generators ever since the lower half of manhattan lost power monday night, when sandy came ashore. 17 million gallons of water flooded bellevue hospital's basement. after that shot we showed you last night of hospital employees making a human chai
slamming new york city. >> few more days and no power new york might get weird. >> on cbs "this morning." >> speaking foreign language >> when your city is flooding that's as bad as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. >>> welcome to cbs "this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. the extent of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched
amtrak will begin offering limited service between new york city and boston. and new jersey transit will also start moving today with limited service. the new york subway system continues to make advances. the "m" train linking queens to manhattan just started running, but there are still no trains running below 34th street where half of manhattan remains in the dark. so the millions of new yorkers who depend on subways, they're now waiting in those long lines for buses. for those who drive into new york city, the lines at city bridges stretched for miles yesterday, enough to make you turn around and just stay home. it's simply not worth it. it will take all day to get in in some cases. in an effort to ease gridlock inside the city, the mayor has ordered all vehicles entering manhattan to have at least three passengers for the rest of the week. there are checkpoints set up on the way into manhattan with cars not meeting the three-person rule, those cars turned away. and you're only beginning to make your way into new york if you're lucky enough to find gas for your cars. about 80% o
mister. >> and all that matters. >> amazing time-lapsed video of sandy slamming new york city, the water rushing in, power going out. >> new york might get weird with a few more days without power. [ speaking spanish ] >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. as you wake up in the west, the extent of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good
, news that is especially welcome here on this hard-hit island. the new york city marathon scheduled for sunday which starts here on the island has been canceled for the first time in its 42-year history, and that is a huge welcome relief to a lot of people here, who frankly were just outraged the idea that the marathon would take place and would take resources that are still badly needed here. there's a lot of people here on this island tonight who feel like they have been forgotten and it really wasn't until today that they started to see supplies coming in and a lot of it in the area that i'm in right now, is just volunteers. folks who have come here on their own from other parts of the city or other parts of staten island with food, whatever they can bring. there's a lot of folks who live down the street in pitch blackness and they're afraid to leave their destroyed houses because of safety concerns. they don't want to leave their things out. this is the home of a woman named sheila. it's all that's left of her home. she's lived here for some 40 years. she was able to salvage a f
heavy heart today, tonight, that we share that the best way to help new york city at this time is to say that we will not be you conducting the 2012 ing new york city marathon. >> i guess my question is what's going to happen to all the supplies? i guess those are privately owned. i'm not sure who owns them. but i would hope, and i think a lot of people here i talked to in the last hour or two, hope that those things, the generators at the very least, would be distributed, the port-a-potties would be used here. >> that's what the new york marathon is saying, they will mobilize the generators, the water, the food that was going to be used. the people need those port-a-potties. they don't have anywhere to go. >> no place around here. >> the reason people are staying in their homes, that's because there's looting going on. people's homes are being robbed. so to compound the tragedy, compound the devastation, now these poor people basically, they don't want to leave. the temperatures are dropping. within the last hour or two, it dropped 20 degrees and the people here really desperately need
ago aaa reports nearly two-thirds of all gas stations in new york city and new jersey are shut down. the federal government took new action, though, today in the past several hours to get more fuel into the communities. with gas lines throughout the region stretching for miles, the department of homeland security has eased restrictions on foreign flag oil tankers. jim cantore has more for us on this problem. >> hey, tamron. this is what i would call an orderly gas line, even though it's packed, it's orderly he. people are lined up to each pump, and they filled the tanks with tangers that came in here. this is a nice supply of gas here at the vince lombardi truck stop. back towards the west, you can see here this gentleman, this police officer is actually directing traffic coming in from the exit into which line they should get in. as we show you where that line is, it travels all the way back up around to the turnpike. last night we understand this line was all the way out into the turnpike, which creates a dangerous situation there. so this is pretty good. you have about an hour an
that fills up during major storms. >>> more on the situation here in new york city. some signs of recovery, if ever so slight. >> uh-huh. >> of street lights in lower manhattan which was inundated with wa water were restored yesterday. >> those living near the world trade center site, were first to have theirs turned back on. >> it was impossible to miss here in my hometown. lots of new yorkers walking instead of using limited bus service available. things will ease a bit today. parts of the city's extensive subway cyst,000 tell are reopening today. and measures are being put in place to ease gridlock on the streets. >> some folks had extremely long commutes because of the gridlock, yeah. resourcefulne resourcefulness, new york style. these folks hit a bank and used its power to charge cell phones. customers across northeast are having trouble completing calls because of knocked out transmission sites. late yesterday, at & t, team mobile, announced plans to share their networks during the aftermath. nice move, companies! >> new yorkers. >> been together. can you hear me now? >> resill yenl
. the damage felt at the seaside communities and jersey shore and coastal areas in and around new york city. after two days of suspended animation, wall street was up and operating on generator power, but the rest of lower manhattan remains dark, and the city subways and commuter rails which bring millions to work etch day have just barely begun to return to service. with some tunnels still full of seawater the damage will not be repaired overnight. two days after sandy made landfall emergency officials report at least 63 dead, including as many as 30 in new york and eight in new jersey. 6 million homes and businesses in 17 states without power. including around 650,000 in new york city alone. and costs to the country's economy estimated between $10 billion and $20 billion and growing. we're going to talk about the political, economic and environment implications of hurricane sandy for the next two hours, including how this natural disaster has linked this year's prominent foes, president obama andries and chris christie. both told reporters that they were determined to repair and rebuild t
, especially with people a little older. new york city gets down to 34. that's the city. you go outside of the city, and some of the affected areas. the power's out. you got all that cold sitting around. it could be in the 20s, easily. and the windchill will be even worse. i wanted to mention that. and then, i got another threat, of course i do. wednesday into thursday, that cold air meets moisture in the south. does it sound familiar? it's not the same. i promise you, it's not the same. five-foot to ten-foot waves are possible. and some snow heading to some of the inland and higher elevation areas. i'll have more on this and the nation's weather coming up. for now, back to dan. >> just what we do not need in the disaster zone. ginger, thank you. >>> this morning, the feds say they are taking measures in the massive gas shortages. these are reminiscent of the 1970s gas crisis. people are starting to get very, very cranky out there. can this new action taken by fema and the military make a difference? alex perez is in clifton, new jersey. good morning to you, sir. >> reporter: dan, good
. >> new york cannot be understood aside from this geography. indeed, no city could. be new york more so that almost any city in the river. because here you have what's really a natural location for a great city. it's probably one of the three greatest harbors in the world. and what's key is that at the very heart of new york is an island, manhattan. so that the indians, who were not in most places in the united states, in the early 17th century, were on the island of manhattan. because it was a natural location for a great city. >> that's a clip from the beginning of the definitive documentary about new york city, rick burns' "new york," a documentary film. as a natural location for a city, new york was sociologically and politically shaped by countless waves of new immigrants. but fundamentally, new york has always been a city shaped by water. the long, skinny island of brooklynn and queens to its east, staten island five miles south of long island. and the bronx, the only part of new york city on the american mainland, itself surrounded by water on three sides. if this week's megastor
from the metropolitan transit authority. that's the agency in charge of mass transit in new york city. look at the destruction there. that is the brooklyn battery tunnel flooded almost to the ceiling there. there's one of the subway stations close by. >>> mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo are touring the damage today and we will be following along with them. >>> now, even if your house an car are okay, what can you do? gasoline supplies are running low for cars and generators. coming up, we're going to map out the system to show you where the real bottleneck, the problems are. >>> and, advice from new orleans to new york. they've been through this before in the port of new orleans. what are the lessons they learned and how can it help here in the new york metropolitan area? >>> sue herera is off today. simon is in and at nyse. >> this is a good rally that we've got on the back of the economic data that came through today in advance, importantly, of tomorrow's employment report. you see this we are off our highs but it is still triple digit. volume is good. the volume yesterday actually
distribution sites open staffed by national guard members, new york city service volunteers and by the staff of the salvation army, the distributed something like 290,000 meals in nearly half a million bottles of water yesterday via those sites reopen again today from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. open for us, saturday 1:00 until 5:00 and we will keep them open as long as they are needed. we have to come up with a long-term plan for people out of their homes for months, not able to cook and find food, and we're working on that but our first concern is to meet the immediate needs of people and hope what electricity comes back to some, the population that will really need our help will be down to it more manageable size but whatever size it is i am convinced we have the resources and the drive and the management to do so. anyone who visit visit one of o3 sites will be able to take three meals and bottles of water. people should bring their own bags to carry the food and water if at all possible. to publicize their hours and locations of these homes they've handed out thousands of flyers in english and spa
. almost a million people still without power this morning in the new york city area where overnight temperatures fell to the 30s. new york city mayor michael bloomberg is urging those without power to go to a shelter. city officials are handing out 25,000 blankets to those who refuse to leave their homes. >> i have no power. no generator but my house is intact. i won't have power for a week or so. >> most schools in new york city are scheduled to reopen tomorrow. a week after the storm hit. many students have trouble getting to school due to the shortage of gas and disruption to public transportation. janetny pal ton know -- janet napolitano is scheduled to visit new jersey. gas is rationing in that state. the storm is being blamed for 23 deaths in new jersey and 107 deaths nation-wide. >>> there are no signs this morning of a man who disappeared from a peninsula mental health facility. 67-year-old kenneth morrison was reported seen at second street. he is described as 5'7", 220 pounds with gray hair and a beard. >>> a richmond firefighter is recovering this morning after suffering
like i have never experienced in my life in new york city. it's something that has been missing on the streets of new york during the storm. they were empty, but today with public transportation shut down, and the crane disruption, commuters sat for hours and hours and hours in bumper-to-bumper traffic. we ran into a lot of trouble ourselves as we tried to get to hoboken. it took us a half hour to move two blocks and another two plus hours to get to hoboken which is five miles away. hopefully this will make the commute easier for some, tomorrow parts of the new york city subway will reopen which is miraculous because the pictures you're seeing, that's still the case in some parts of the system but they've managed to open other parts. it's an incredible testament to new york. still to come, coming to the rescue, i spent the day with the national guard in hoboken, new jersey, going door to door helping people from their homes and governor cuomo of new york visited what's left of a queens neighborhood torched by a massive fire. residents tried to come home for the first time and fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 467 (some duplicates have been removed)